scoop
I don't know how this masterpiece of satire and politics, journalism, herd instincts, disinformation, and British class consciousness escapes constant mention in today's world. It is one of the few books that makes me laugh out loud while reading it. Briefly, though a social mix-up, the country life columnist of the Daily Beast gets sent to Ishmalia to cover a breaking story of war. In his generous ineptitude and passivity, he stumbles into the real story. Cable news frenzy, oligarchic liars, orange-faced putincrats, it's all here.
Everything is Illuminated by Jonathan Safran Foer
An amazing book with both the main character who's a writer, and his translator who wants to be a writer.
Jabberwocky.
In 7th grade English we were required to memorize and recite a poem per week. I chose Jabberwocky because it allowed me to be creative and bigger than life expressive, still my favorite.
Catcher in the Rye
Catcher in the Rye. I know, I know. But this book... either you get it, or you hate it, I guess. There are a number of trailers for indie film versions on YouTube, but none of them are the way I see it in my head. The voice is wrong, the gestures seem forced. To me, Holden isn't awkward or an obvious outsider. He thinks and watches, critically; he perceives and judges, but he's still blending in and interacting. He's not the weird nerd shuffling along smoking self-consciously; he's not a dick or a whiner; he isn't smug, or forcefully glib like Anton Yelchin in Charlie Bartlett (urgh). He's just being. Like a young Johnny Depp perhaps... (youtube.com/watch?v=87zkYShT17s)
100 years of Solitude.
After trying to read it for years and failing, I read it and loved it at last. Time and life experience conquers all.
Up and vanished
This podcast actually results in the case being solved!
Momofuku Daisho Toronto
In New York, I have to walk all over the city to get my Chang fix. In TO, you get them all together - and the Daisho is amazing. Pork leak dumplings w mustard seed and chilis. So good.